1960s and how the Vietnam war affected it.

The 1960s seems very much to be about questioning authority figures and advocating notions of peace. Subcultures that stand out in everyone’s minds is ‘The Hippie’ culture. Where did this stem from?

The Vietnam War was a Cold War military conflict that occurred in Vietnam, Laos, and Cambodia from 1 November 1955  to the fall of Saigon on 30 April 1975.The cold war was the premise of the Vietnam war.

The US invaded Vietnam to stop the spread of communism. The main policy of the Vietnam war was containment. The U.S sought to aid south Vietnam against the communist north Vietnam to stop the spread of their ideology. The effects of the Vietnam war on the USA was severe and in some cases long-term. Total casualties for the US were  58,000 solders were killed, 150,000 were wounded and approximately 21,000 were permanently disabled.

The battle did not end for the veterans who returned home to the US as a considerable number suffered post traumatic stress disorder.

Long term effects included a large federal budget deficit, as the US spent nearly 111 billion dollars on the war. The result was inevitably a north Vietnamese victory and the installment of communist governments in Vietnam, Cambodia and Laos.

involvement escalated in the early 1960s, with U.S. troop levels tripling in 1961 and tripling again in 1962. This obviously causing raised in concern in western countries and therefore directly affecting people’s perceptions and causing mass protests.

This led to the popular slogan which resounds through the 1960’s hippie culture which is ‘Make love not war’

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